That $5 trillion isn’t gone away you know…

The $5 trillion wiped off the value of global equities as the Chinese market collapse spreads hasn’t all vanished – it’s just gone somewhere else in search of a different bubble.  What is really spectacular is not the collapse of Chinese markets, but the capacity of people to ignore the obvious indicators that it was on the way. Continue reading That $5 trillion isn’t gone away you know…

Reading into Digital Humanities (Summer 2015)

New Semester in Six Weeks! The summer is flying by, this years cohort of Masters students are deep in writing their dissertations, most of the places for next year have been filled, BA offers will be going on in a few weeks,  and new students are asking “What should I read before we start”.  Reading into DH is a moving target, but here I suggest some of my favourite entry points. Most of this is freely available on the open web. Continue reading Reading into Digital Humanities (Summer 2015)

Mahara: No longer good enough

Portfolio based assessments are a staple in my classes: I design courses so that students build material over the whole course for collection and submission at the end.  I should probably use a ePortfolio tool to support that, but not even Mahara, easily the best of them, is good enough. Why?  it lacks three key features – group export, export to pdf and  capturing bibliographic metadata. Continue reading Mahara: No longer good enough

Persistent Personal Learning Archives

Digitally archiving most of your learning activity is now possible, which means you can share it later, out of context. As an example of how this might be problematic, suppose you present in an interview a short video clip of a classroom discussion on a controversial topic in which you demonstrate excellence and I appear to be incompetent or immoral – and I happen to be the next candidate facing that interview board.

This is now a plausible scenario, whereas a decade ago it was impossible. The transformation in digital media over the past decade has radically changed things which we formerly took for granted. I’m discussing this in my paper at PLEConf14 next week, but I wanted to bring out the central assumption here – that learners can create Persistent Personal  Learning Archives. Continue reading Persistent Personal Learning Archives